Microsoft introduces Windows as a Service #waas #tech #it #management

With Windows 10, there are two release types: feature updates that add new functionality two to three times per year, and quality updates that provide security and reliability fixes at least once a month.

J. Decker at Microsoft Windows IT Center recently posted an article explaining the streamlined IT management of Windows 10 workstations and the concept of Windows as a Service. Some of the changes include:

  • new features will be delivered to the Windows Insider community as soon as possible — during the development cycle, through a process called flighting — so that organizations can see exactly what Microsoft is developing and start their testing as soon as possible
  • most Windows 7–compatible desktop applications will be compatible with Windows 10 straight out of the box. Windows 10 achieved such high compatibility because the changes in the existing Win32 application programming interfaces were minimal
  • new hardware is not needed for Windows 10 as any device capable of running Windows 7 or later can run Windows 10
  • there are two release types: feature updates that add new functionality two to three times per year, and quality updates that provide security and reliability fixes at least once a month
  • the LTSB servicing model prevents Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB devices from receiving the usual feature updates and provides only quality updates to ensure that device security stays up to date.

 

Here’s a little more information about Quality Updates which will replace the Monthly Updates from previous versions of Windows.

“In Windows 10, rather than receiving several updates each month and trying to figure out which the organization needs, which ultimately causes platform fragmentation, administrators will see one cumulative monthly update that supersedes the previous month’s update, containing both security and nonsecurity fixes. This approach makes patching simpler and ensures that customers’ devices are more closely aligned with the testing done at Microsoft, reducing unexpected issues resulting from patching. The left side of Figure 1 provides an example of Windows 7 machines in an enterprise and what their current patch level might look like. On the right is what Microsoft’s test environment PCs contain. This drastic difference is the basis for many compatibility issues and system anomalies related to Windows updates.”

According to Ms. Decker, “[the] improvements focus on maximizing customer involvement in Windows development, simplifying the deployment and servicing of Windows client computers, and leveling out the resources needed to deploy and maintain Windows over time.”

You can read the full post here.

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